Do Landlords Have to Fix TVs and Electronics?

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Televisions and other electronics are usually considered "amenities." The landlord is not required by most state laws to fix or replace a broken amenity unless it’s required by the lease. If the lease is silent, look to state and local laws. In some states, landlords who supply amenities may be responsible for their maintenance.

Fixing Amenities

Most states don’t require landlords to fix amenities unless they promised to do so in their lease. However, it is common for landlords to repair these amenities because the cost of finding new tenants to move into an apartment without working kitchen amenities is high and can exceed the cost of making the repairs. Some states, especially ones with large tenant populations, may require landlords to fix any amenities that were provided when the tenant moved in. Alternatively, many tenants and landlords agree to a reduction in rent in exchange for an appliance that no longer functions, especially in luxury building or when the rent is high.

Smart Homes

Landlords generally need to fix smart home devices to the extent they affect basic well-being. For example, if the apartment comes with a digital thermostat which breaks or is hacked, the landlord remains responsible in nearly every state for ensuring that the home is still at a livable temperature (Arkansas is an exception). This means the landlord can choose to fix the digital thermostat or find another solution to regulate the temperature in the home. The same rule (called the "implied warranty of habitability") applies to any digital device that maintains essential utilities, such as digital locks or a smart faucet. Landlords are not responsible for items such as Google Home or Alexa which are broken because they are not essential to providing essential services like water, food, and shelter.

Fixing Amenities


Most states don’t require landlords to fix amenities unless they promised to do so in their lease. However, it is common for landlords to repair these amenities because the cost of finding new tenants to move into an apartment without working kitchen amenities is high and can exceed the cost of making the repairs. Some states, especially ones with large tenant populations, may require landlords to fix any amenities that were provided when the tenant moved in. Alternatively, many tenants and landlords agree to a reduction in rent in exchange for an appliance that no longer functions, especially in luxury building or when the rent is high.

Smart Homes


Landlords generally need to fix smart home devices to the extent they affect basic well-being. For example, if the apartment comes with a digital thermostat which breaks or is hacked, the landlord remains responsible in nearly every state for ensuring that the home is still at a livable temperature (Arkansas is an exception). This means the landlord can choose to fix the digital thermostat or find another solution to regulate the temperature in the home. The same rule (called the "implied warranty of habitability") applies to any digital device that maintains essential utilities, such as digital locks or a smart faucet. Landlords are not responsible for items such as Google Home or Alexa which are broken because they are not essential to providing essential services like water, food, and shelter.

Last Update : September 12, 2018 UTC

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