Do Landlords Have to Install or Fix Elevators?

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There are no federal laws requiring a landlord to provide an elevator, but the American Disabilities Act has strict guidelines about maintaining existing elevators with accessible features. Also, if an elevator is provided, landlords are required to maintain any elevators in a safe condition and follow any local regulations about its safety. People with disabilities may be able to require the landlord the landlord to provide a working elevator where the cost to do so is not prohibitive.

Safety

While landlords are not required to offer elevators, any elevators offered to tenants must be safe for their use. States and local governments tend to have elevator safety agencies that require inspections and certificates. Failure to obey these laws may result in fines. Additionally, if the landlord allows tenants to use an elevator with known defects, they are likely going to be liable for any injuries or fatalities that occur from that defect.

American Disabilities Act

The ADA primarily applies to buildings with existing elevators with more than three floors or which are 3,000 square feet or larger (there are also a few other requirements that must be met). In such case, elevators may need to be provided meeting ADA’s strict requirements, including detailed specifics on the height of the buttons, how long the elevator must remain open, and more. Violations can be reported to authorities or to the many attorneys that specialize in class action ADA cases. http://www.elevatordesigninfo.com/americans-with-disabilities-act-requirements-for-elevators

Disability Accommodation

The Fair Housing Act requires landlords to provide reasonable accommodations to people with mental or physical disabilities. Often, landlords will meet this requirement by giving lower floors to people with disabilities that prevent them from using stairs. Where that isn't possible, whether a landlord needs to include an elevator depends on whether the cost is reasonable. For example, if the building has no elevator, the cost may be very high. However, if the elevator has been broken and can be fixed with reasonable cost, then the landlord may be required to fix the elevator for the tenant if no other reasonable option is available.

Reporting Problems

Tenants that are concerned about elevators should call local housing authorities for help. RenterPeace offers a digital association so tenants can chat with other tenants who have the same landlord (typically people in the same building), where they can discuss potential options as well as share information and costs.

Safety


While landlords are not required to offer elevators, any elevators offered to tenants must be safe for their use. States and local governments tend to have elevator safety agencies that require inspections and certificates. Failure to obey these laws may result in fines. Additionally, if the landlord allows tenants to use an elevator with known defects, they are likely going to be liable for any injuries or fatalities that occur from that defect.

American Disabilities Act


The ADA primarily applies to buildings with existing elevators with more than three floors or which are 3,000 square feet or larger (there are also a few other requirements that must be met). In such case, elevators may need to be provided meeting ADA’s strict requirements, including detailed specifics on the height of the buttons, how long the elevator must remain open, and more. Violations can be reported to authorities or to the many attorneys that specialize in class action ADA cases. http://www.elevatordesigninfo.com/americans-with-disabilities-act-requirements-for-elevators

Disability Accommodation


The Fair Housing Act requires landlords to provide reasonable accommodations to people with mental or physical disabilities. Often, landlords will meet this requirement by giving lower floors to people with disabilities that prevent them from using stairs. Where that isn't possible, whether a landlord needs to include an elevator depends on whether the cost is reasonable. For example, if the building has no elevator, the cost may be very high. However, if the elevator has been broken and can be fixed with reasonable cost, then the landlord may be required to fix the elevator for the tenant if no other reasonable option is available.

Reporting Problems


Tenants that are concerned about elevators should call local housing authorities for help. RenterPeace offers a digital association so tenants can chat with other tenants who have the same landlord (typically people in the same building), where they can discuss potential options as well as share information and costs.

Last Update : July 22, 2018 UTC

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