Do Landlords Have to Maintain Furnishings?

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Landlords may provide fully or partially furnished rental units to tenants, usually at higher rents and security deposits. Especially in student housing, this may include beds, couches, paintings, tables, dressers, chairs, and similar furniture. However, landlords are not typically required under most state laws to replace furnishings unless it says so in the lease. A few jurisdictions require landlords to maintain any amenities or furnishings that were provided when the unit was rented.

Tenant Damage and Misuse

Tenants are responsible for keeping the rental unit and furnishings clean and free from damage beyond reasonable wear and tear. Upon moving out, if the tenant has negligently or deliberately caused damage to furnishings beyond normal wear and tear, a landlord may deduct the cost of repair from the tenant's security deposit.

Maintenance and Fixing

Because furnishings are difficult to destroy on their own, it’s usually assumed that a broken couch, bed, or similar furnishing is the fault of the tenant. If the damage is caused by the tenant, the landlord is not required to fix the problem unless the lease explicitly requires them to. In some cases, a tenant may be able to show that the furnishing broke through no fault of their own and that it needs repair from ordinary wear and tear. In such cases, most states DON'T require landlords to maintain furnishings unless they promised to do so in their lease. Some states, especially ones with large tenant populations, may require landlords to fix any amenities that were provided when the tenant moved in. Alternatively, many tenants and landlords agree to a reduction in rent in exchange for a broken furnishing. See your state and local laws for more detail.

Tenant Damage and Misuse


Tenants are responsible for keeping the rental unit and furnishings clean and free from damage beyond reasonable wear and tear. Upon moving out, if the tenant has negligently or deliberately caused damage to furnishings beyond normal wear and tear, a landlord may deduct the cost of repair from the tenant's security deposit.

Maintenance and Fixing


Because furnishings are difficult to destroy on their own, it’s usually assumed that a broken couch, bed, or similar furnishing is the fault of the tenant. If the damage is caused by the tenant, the landlord is not required to fix the problem unless the lease explicitly requires them to.

In some cases, a tenant may be able to show that the furnishing broke through no fault of their own and that it needs repair from ordinary wear and tear. In such cases, most states DON'T require landlords to maintain furnishings unless they promised to do so in their lease. Some states, especially ones with large tenant populations, may require landlords to fix any amenities that were provided when the tenant moved in. Alternatively, many tenants and landlords agree to a reduction in rent in exchange for a broken furnishing. See your state and local laws for more detail.

Last Update : July 22, 2018 UTC

Comments discussing Furnishings

almost 2 years ago
1
votes

My landlord is saying I left the carpet dirtier than when I got it and want to charge me for replacing it with a much more expensive one, which comes out to exactly the cost of my deposit.
Renter in Austin, TX, USA
Furnishings